The Count Ugolino in prison. nineteenth-century painting by Giuseppe Diotti

The Count Ugolino in prison. nineteenth-century painting by Giuseppe Diotti

One of the most famous passages of the Divine Comedy It is related to the story of the Count Ugolino, of which it is said in Dell Canto 33’Inferno.

Ugolino della Gherardesca (1210-1289), was a well-known Italian politician of the '200 destined to a sad end: locked up in a tower with her children, He was left to starve with them (the legend of any possible cannibalism for his part has never been historically proven).

Now, on this character in many aspects still obscure, you could do a little’ more light: In fact, for six weeks, It will dig in the only part of the Lungarno unbuilt Pisa, to find one that was his home.

To achieve it we follow the instructions about it in a text dating back to the Middle Ages (Photo gives: ilruggiero.it